Posted in Art

Artist Appreciation Nook: David Hockney and His Pop Art Innovations

One thing I love about art is innovation. As observed through the years, new artists emerged to provide another interesting style on the canvas. I think they make art even more interesting because, well, they put out something new and relevant to current social issues. That’s why when I heard news about a David Hockney art exhibition this year, I want to go to Tate Gallery pronto.

 

Who Is David Hockney?

Well, David Hockney is one of the most influential pop art contributors. Being tagged as an “influential” artist is definitely not something to be gained in a snap. Hockney really came out of his way to present bold and meaningful artworks for how many years. The now 79-year-old British artist has received so many prominent accolades. For one, he gained the Order of Merit and the Order of the Companions of Honour. He is also acknowledged by the members of the exclusive Royal Academy of Arts.

 

Best Works

Interestingly, David Hockney is not just a painter. He is also a photographer, a stage designer, a printmaker and a draughtsman. Yes, he is really a perfect example of an all-around artist.

What makes me even more excited about Hockney’s art exhibition is the inclusion of his works as a student in the early 1960s. The retrospective of how Hockney developed as an artist from those early works is a great opportunity to know him more. Most of Hockney’s memorable works have something to do with portraits, homosexuality, landscapes and sophisticated photo collages.

Paintings of Homosexuality (1961-1963)

“We Two Boys Together Clinging” (1961)

David Hockney is a homosexual. He is a brave artist, painting about his affection for men. Two of his famous works that have something to do with his sexuality are “We Two Boys Together Clinging” and “Domestic Scene, Los Angeles.”

“Domestic Scene, Los Angeles” (1963)

 

Portraits (1968-1976)

“Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy” (1971)

Most of David Hockney’s early works are portraits. Hockney loved painting his parents, relatives, friends, lovers and inspirations. He managed to paint fellow artist Mo McDermott, fashion designers Ossie Clark and Celia Birtwell, art dealer Nicholas Wilder, curator Henry Geldzahler, and ballet dancer Wayne Sleep.

“Mo McDermott” (1976)

 

“Joiners” (1980s)

“My Mother, Bolton Abbey” (1982)

This is when David Hockney decided to start with photo collages. Hockney called those works “joiners.” He made small patches from photographs to form a unified image. The final result of his joiners is similar to Cubism. Hockney’s first photo collage is inspired by his mother. He continued to do portraits like “Kasmin.” Then, he switched to landscapes like “Pearblossom Highway # 2.”

“Pearblossom Highway # 2” (1986)

 

Vogue Cover (December 1985)

Because of David Hockney’s stylish art, French Vogue magazine used his Celia Birtwell portrait as the cover design. The cover seems like an abstract painting. But, it resembles Birtwell’s face.

“Celia Birtwell” for Vogue (December 1985)

 

“Bigger Trees Near Warter” (2007)

This is considered to be David Hockney’s biggest painting. The artwork measures 15 by 40 feet. Hockney’s Yorkshire home inspired this painting. On 50 separate canvases, Hockney painted specific parts of the big picture. The finished work is a nostalgic image of big trees.

“Bigger Trees Near Warter” (2007)

 

Final Thoughts

Paintings may just be eye-candy for some spectators. But, artists put their heart and soul into their artworks. David Hockney is definitely no exception. His daring, stylish and innovative personality is clearly depicted on his works.